SNAPSHOT WRITING .
DIRECTION: 

Write your own snapshot image of an event that occurred in your life.
Use the CRITERIA listed below.

1.Must be at least one paragraph.(5-sentences or more).
2.Use vivid ADJECTIVES:e.g. displeased,greatness etc
3.Use action VERBS: e.g.stopping,repeated etc
4.Include one or more of these Figures of speech.
SIMILE.
METAPHOR.
PERSONIFICATION.
YOU CAN USE THE DICTIONARY TO FIND MEANING
OF THESE Figures of speech.
Continue through 10 of the criteria in the workbook.

Comprehension




Reading comprehension refers to the students' ability to read and understand information presented in written form. Reading is not a passive activity. Good readers interact with text, making and validating predictions, creating questions about the characters, main idea or plot, monitoring their own understanding of the text, clarifying the confusing parts, and connecting text events to their own prior knowledge and experiences. All teachers must teach students the comprehension skills necessary to help them understand text and be successful independent readers. 

​comprehension monitoring strategies:

Be aware of what they do understand
Identify what they do not understand
Use appropriate strategies to resolve problems in comprehension.

Answering questions

Questions can be effective because they:
Give students a purpose for reading
Focus students' attention on what they are to learn
Help students to think actively as they read
Encourage students to monitor their comprehension
Help students to review content and relate what they have learned to what they already know.


Recognizing story structure

In story structure instruction, students learn to identify the categories of content (characters, setting, events, problem, resolution). Often, students learn to recognize story structure through the use of story maps. Instruction in story structure improves students' comprehension.


Summarizing

Summarizing requires students to determine what is important in what they are reading and to put it into their own words. Instruction in summarizing helps students:
Identify or generate main ideas
Connect the main or central ideas
Eliminate unnecessary information
Remember what they read


Literature Circles

Literature Circles are small groups of students who are reading, responding to and discussing the same book. They provide the opportunity for students to have some control over their learning, because students usually choose their own materials. The groups of students respond individually, then have open conversations about their book. The groups are also in charge of determining how many pages are to be read each night. 

While Reading a Story/Novel
**Illustrate your favorite part of the story     and tell why you liked it.
**Write a letter to a character in the story.
**Compare this story and another one in      your own words.
**Write a poem about something in the        story.

Six Reading Comprehensive Strategies

1- Making connections:
Encourage students to make connections between what they are reading and their personal experiences. They can relate it to events, people, issues and other things in their life.

2-Visualizing
Students can use this strategy to help them create visual pictures of the meanings they uncover from the text.

3-Asking questions
To actively interact with a text, students need to be able to ask questions related to the text like what the message of the text is, what value does the text add to me? Why is the author saying so…etc

4-Inferring
Students need not only contend themselves with the visible textual output but should delve deeper into the hidden layers of meanings drawing on external clues and inferring meanings that would not otherwise be exposed.

5- Determining importance
Students should be able to determine main and topical ideas of the text and be able to understand and articulate them clearly

6-Synthesizing
This is where students use their analytic skills to create a coherent and meaningful body of ideas drawing on both the information they have garnered from the text and their existing knowledge.


The Chemist
Stephenie Meyer
View More by This Author
This book is available for download with iBooks on your Mac or iOS device, and with iTunes on your computer. Books can be read with iBooks on your Mac or iOS device.
Description
In this gripping page-turner, an ex-agent on the run from her former employers must take one more case to clear her name and save her life. 

She used to work for the U.S. government, but very few people ever knew that. An expert in her field, she was one of the darkest secrets of an agency so clandestine it doesn't even have a name. And when they decided she was a liability, they came for her without warning. 

Now she rarely stays in the same place or uses the same name for long. They've killed the only other person she trusted, but something she knows still poses a threat. They want her dead, and soon. 

When her former handler offers her a way out, she realizes it's her only chance to erase the giant target on her back. But it means taking one last job for her ex-employers. To her horror, the information she acquires only makes her situation more dangerous. 

Resolving to meet the threat head-on, she prepares for the toughest fight of her life but finds herself falling for a man who can only complicate her likelihood of survival. As she sees her choices being rapidly whittled down, she must apply her unique talents in ways she never dreamed of. 

In this tautly plotted novel, Meyer creates a fierce and fascinating new heroine with a very specialized skill set. And she shows once again why she's one of the world's bestselling authors.

The Girl from Venice
Martin Cruz Smith
View More by This Author
This book is available for download with iBooks on your Mac or iOS device, and with iTunes on your computer. Books can be read with iBooks on your Mac or iOS device.
Description
The highly anticipated new standalone novel from Martin Cruz Smith, whom The Washington Post has declared “that uncommon phenomenon: a popular and well-regarded crime novelist who is also a writer of real distinction,” The Girl from Venice is a suspenseful World War II love story set against the beauty, mystery, and danger of occupied Venice.

Venice, 1945. The war may be waning, but the city known as La Serenissima is still occupied and the people of Italy fear the power of the Third Reich. One night, under a canopy of stars, a fisherman named Cenzo comes across a young woman’s body floating in the lagoon and soon discovers that she is still alive and in trouble.

Born to a wealthy Jewish family, Giulia is on the run from the Wehrmacht SS. Cenzo chooses to protect Giulia rather than hand her over to the Nazis. This act of kindness leads them into the world of Partisans, random executions, the arts of forgery and high explosives, Mussolini’s broken promises, the black market and gold, and, everywhere, the enigmatic maze of the Venice Lagoon.

The Girl from Venice is a thriller, a mystery, and a retelling of Italian history that will take your breath away. Most of all it is a love story.